Einkorn

The first grain to be domesticated by the peoples of the Fertile Crescent was Einkorn. With a rich nutty flavor, it has the highest amount of protein of any grain at 18%. And, it has been found that some people with Gluten sensitivities can digest Einkorn more readily.
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Teff

8,000 years ago, the peoples of the Ethiopian highlands began domesticating the grain Teff. It is the main ingredient for preparing the Ethiopian staple “Injera”, a sourdough-risen flatbread.
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Chia

The Aztecs first domesticated Chia in their native lands of South America. It was used in medicine, ground into flour, mixed as an ingredient in drinks, and pressed for oil. In Mayan, Chia means “Strength”.
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Amaranth

Amaranth is referred to as a “pseudo-cereal”, as it is not a true grain. It has seen a resurgence in uses over the past several years. It is very high in proteins, fiber, and trace minerals. And, research has shown possible cancer preventive and other health related abilities. 
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Chickpea

Chickpeas and chickpea flour can be found in cuisines all over the world. They can be cooked and eaten cold in salads, cooked in stews, ground into flour, ground and shaped in balls and fried as falafel, made into a batter and baked to make farinata or cecina, or fried to make panelle.
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Rye

Rye has been linked to a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, colon cancer, breast cancer and diabetes. Because rye is harder to refine than wheat, it retains more of its nutrients.
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Oats

The grain of the Bronze Age farmers, this staple has nurtured people for millennia, and can even be malted and fermented to make Oat Beer.
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Bears Paw